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Maths

KS3 Maths

Introduction

At Wye School, we follow the National Curriculum at Key Stage 3. We teach our pupils to be confident problem solvers with a good foundation in number work. This aids their progression to GCSE by creating strong mathematical and logical foundations and building these up with algebra, statistics and geometry. We follow the United Learning Maths Mastery style curriculum which has embedded deep questioning and problem solving activities.

We assess our pupils regularly at the end of each of our six terms with United Learning assessments. Our pupils get a percentage for each KPI (topic) they have studied up to that point in the year which gives pupils the opportunity to improve on each topic each half term. These KPIs also help teachers, pupils and parents to understand exactly which topic pupils need extra support in to help every child reach their potential.  

To enrich the learning of our most able students, we create an environment with open ended stimulating problems. For our lower ability pupils, we incorporate a stronger focus on core number skills to ensure a fundamental understanding before moving on. All of our year 7 and 8 pupils have a Times Tables Rockstar account (https://ttrockstars.com/) to ensure they are supported with their times tables at home and at school.

Enrichment opportunities for Mathematics at Wye include a chance to sit the UK Maths Challenge (https://www.ukmt.org.uk), a gifted and talented trip to the University of Kent, Maths club with a focus on puzzles, paper craft and nets club, Maths relay and G+T Saturday lectures at the University of Kent for our year 9 students.

 

Year 7

The beginning of year 7 particularly focuses on core number work to ensure our pupils are confident with this core foundation in mathematics. By the end of year 7 pupils will have studied calculations, geometry, fractions, basic algebra and percentages. Our Independent Learning Projects aim to give pupils knowledge of mathematics as a subject, and not just mathematical methods.

Parents and Carers can support their children by practicing times tables and using mental maths in everyday life situations such as baking, reading train timetables or working out change. Pupils revise regularly for their termly tests, and parents can aid this by supporting their child with revision techniques. Useful websites for revision include; ttrockstars, Hegarty Maths and BBC Bitesize.

 

Year 8

In year 8, we expand upon previous understanding of our year 7s with more practice of number, algebra, geometry and statistics. Pupils also start learning about proportional reasoning and its uses in real-life situations. The independent learning projects in year 8 ask pupils to complete extended investigations into world statistics and 3D product design (tennis ball packaging).

Parents and Carers can again support their children by practicing times tables and using mental maths in everyday life situations such as baking, reading train timetables or working out change. Pupils revise regularly for their termly tests, and parents can aid this by supporting their child with revision techniques. Useful websites for revision include; ttrockstars, Hegarty Maths and BBC Bitesize.

 

Year 9

In year 9, pupils are extending their knowledge for year 7 and 8 even further and preparing for the start of their GCSE. Pupils study a range of topics with a strong emphasis on algebraic reasoning. Instead of an extended investigation for their Independent Learning Project, pupils receive 20 homework questions a week over two terms.

Parents and Carers can again support their children by using mental maths in everyday life situations such as working out change and budgets and helping to plan excursions and holidays. Pupils revise regularly for their termly tests, and parents can aid this by supporting their child with revision techniques. Useful websites for revision include Hegarty Maths and BBC Bitesize.

 

For more information about the mathematics curriculum, please contact Miss R Burden- Rachael.burden@wyeschool.org.uk

 

English

KS3 English

 

Introduction

In English, the key skills being taught are Reading, Writing and Speaking and Listening.

Reading Skills: The pupils learn to look beyond a baseline reading of a text and delve deeper into the meanings within the words. They learn to infer the implicit meanings within a text, a skill crucial to studying English literature in Key Stage 4 and 5.

Writing Skills: The pupils learn to structure writing effectively and also to be conscious of the audience receiving the text and the purpose of the text. By doing this, they also learn how to use appropriate vocabulary that is fit for the task at hand. These writing skills are crucial for English Language studies at Key Stage 4.

Speaking and Listening Skills: During speaking and listening tasks, pupils are encouraged to increase their confidence with public speaking, to use role play to explore ideas and to work effectively in group tasks which require cooperation.  These skills are taught explicitly and support our school policy on standing up to contribute. We emphasise to students how important these skills are, not only for their educational journey, but also for developing key life skills for the world of work.

All students’ work in English is done in booklets, which finish with a formal assessment. The work for the term is laid out in each booklet in a clear and logical structure, with a precise focus on what is being assessed for each task. This helps pupils to focus on particular skills and to develop these to improve their own work.  They do a series of practice activities before the final assessment. 

The pupils are formally assessed at end of each term six times a year. These assessments are designed to test the learning done over the course of the term. They are graded with National Curriculum levels and used to track progress and set personal targets for each individual pupil.

We prefer a dynamic and inclusive approach to teaching, with the pupil being encouraged to do more than the teacher. The key to pupils engaging fully with English is to ensure that the content appeals to the different types of learners in the room. It is imperative that the pupils are immersed in a positive, safe and fun learning environment.

Booklets are differentiated for different ability groups and delivery varies according to this as well. More able pupils are given more autonomy, choices about how to approach tasks and more complex texts and stimulus materials.  In particular, there is a strong focus on higher level analytical skills as these are essential to GCSE and A’ Level success. Less able pupils are helped to access the material in a variety of ways, including personalised booklets for students with low literacy levels. The delivery is adjusted to suit those who prefer visual or kinaesthetic approaches to learning.

 

Year 7

To develop their reading skills, Year 7 study a range of texts including novels, poetry and a range of non-fiction and use these as both stimulus for their own work and to develop their reading skills of inference and analysis.  They also do independent reading as part of their studies. To develop their writing skills, the schemes of learning give them the opportunity to write in a wide range of forms, including recount writing, stories, plays and a range of non-fiction.

 

Year 8

The Year 8 programme builds on the model from Year 7 but with increasing difficulty in terms of the texts studied.  Once again texts serve as a source of stimulus for students’ own writing.  The range studied now includes media and social media texts and pupils develop a more sophisticated understanding of writing for context, audience and purpose. The year 8 programme has a strong focus on the structural features of writing skills and the precise skills of analysis needed for a wide range of texts. The skills developed echo what they will need to be successful at GCSE and beyond.

Parents can support learning in English by encouraging reading in the household; a love of reading not only develops the imagination but also widens the vocabulary and supports spelling. This applies to any texts, not just novels, and can include non-fiction and even websites.  

For more information about the english curriculum, please contact Miss E Ozenbrook - emma.ozenbrook@wyeschool.org.uk

 

Science

KS3 Science

Introduction

At Wye School, we predominantly follow the National Curriculum at Key Stage 3. The scheme of learning is arranged into topics which are Biology, Physics or Chemistry based.  There is a heavy emphasis on practical work and discovery as well as developing investigative skills. We aim to encourage students to be more curious about the world around them and to ask questions of each other and themselves about how and why things around us work.  All students are taught science by specialist teachers with extensive experience of GCSE and A’ level sciences.

We assess our students formally at the end of each termly topic. These results are combined and reported in the form of a national curriculum sub-level each term. Students are measured against an end of year National Curriculum target. To enrich the learning of our most able students, we challenge them with higher order questions, encourage them to research topics further and introduce concepts from GCSE and outside of the curriculum. For our lower ability pupils, we focus on the key learning objectives using practical work, writing frames, role play and modelling to aid learning.

Year 7

With this year group we look at a range of Biology, Chemistry and Physics topics including: Energy, Chemical Reactions, Cells, Space, Elements and Mixtures and Reproduction. We ensure that we are developing core skills of using laboratory equipment, planning investigations, recording data, graphing results and evaluating results. The two ILPs for year 7 are: ‘Sustainability and Our Environment’ and ‘Our Solar System and Beyond’.

Parents can support learning by encouraging their children to become more aware of science around them and become familiar with topical issues in the news. Students revise regularly for end of topic tests and are encouraged to use a range of revision techniques to do this. KS3 BBC Bitesize is a useful website for students to practise their skills and enhance their knowledge by using the interactive revision and test yourself sections.

Year 8

In year 8 students continue to learn more about different Biology, Chemistry and Physics topics including: Microbiology, Practical Chemistry, Light and Sound, Food and Digestion, Speed and Rocks. The core skills of using laboratory equipment, planning investigations, recording data, graphing results and evaluating results are again revisited through the new subject matter. The two ILPs for year 7 are: ‘Food and Digestion’ and ‘Environmental Chemistry’.

Again, parents can support learning by encouraging their children to become more aware of science around them and become familiar with topical issues in the news. Students revise regularly for end of topic tests and are encouraged to use a range of revision techniques to do this. KS3 BBC Bitesize is a useful website for students to practise their skills and enhance their knowledge by using the interactive revision and test yourself sections.

Year 9

In year 9 students continue to learn more about different Biology, Chemistry and Physics topics including: Inheritance and extinction, Reactions of metals, Pressure and moments and Patterns of reactivity. The core skills of using laboratory equipment, planning investigations, recording data, graphing results and evaluating results are again revisited through the new subject matter.

 

In term 4, students are introduced to the first topics of GCSE Biology, Chemistry and Physics. We are studying the AQA Combined Science Trilogy course (worth 2 GCSEs) and separate Biology, Chemistry and Physics GCSEs (3 GCSE). Decisions on which course the students will be entered for will take place in year 10. The Science ILP tasks for terms 4 and 5 will be set by the individual science teacher. Students will get two 30 minute tasks (one from each teacher) which will be consolidation work for what they are studying during the lessons. This will help prepare them for the requirements of GCSE courses.

 

Again, parents can support learning by encouraging their children to become more aware of science around them and become familiar with topical issues in the news. Students revise regularly for end of topic tests and are encouraged to use a range of revision techniques to do this. KS4 BBC GCSE Bitesize is a useful website for students to practise their skills and enhance their knowledge by using the interactive revision and test yourself sections. Once textbooks and revision guides have been published for this new specification, I will give details of our recommendations.

For further information about the science curriculum, please contact Miss S Phillips -   suzanne.phillips@wyeschool.org.uk

 

 

 

Art

KS3 Art

Introduction

In Art, we aim to build confidence, knowledge and skills so that pupils are armed with the appropriate tools to move into GCSE and pursue art at a higher level. Expectation of pupils are high and as a result, work produced is of an excellent standard.

 

The key skills which are taught in art are: appreciation of and learning from artists and crafts people; experimentation with different media; observation research to gather information; creation of sustained pieces of work. Our approach is in line with the National Curriculum where we teach pupils in varied and stimulating ways. At Wye School pupils do project based tasks and from year 7 are taught to address the same assessment objectives that they are marked on for GCSE. They will therefore be well-prepared to start GCSE style projects once they reach this stage.

Pupils work in high quality hard-back sketchbooks on their preparatory work, and then on a suitable surface for their final piece.  Pupils are formerly assessed at the end of each term, although marks throughout the term count towards their term grade. Baseline levels and end of year targets are recorded at the front their sketchbooks.

 

Pupils generally work on individual projects based on a specific topic. They are given tasks that gradually build up their skill and knowledge base so that they are well-equipped with the tools to produce a final piece of work.

More able pupils are given different resources and introduced to more complex techniques.  Less able pupils are always given the opportunity to do the same task as other members of the class as we strongly believe that all pupils can complete an art task to their own personal level. To help them achieve the task, they will be given different resources to support reading and writing activities and alternative methods to help them complete all tasks to a standard at which they are proud.

 

Year 7

The main aims for year 7 are to improve confidence in art and give them a general foundation to art, introducing many skills, techniques and artists. During year 7 pupils build confidence by completing a range of projects. These include drawing, painting, ceramics, sculpture, print making and textures. Many year 7 pupils have not attended specific art lessons before and pupils often start the school year thinking that they cannot do art. This building of confidence through a range of activities is an important part of year 7 and helps erode negative pre-conceived notions about pupils’ art ability.

 

Year 7 do an Independent Learning Project that is based on the built environment. Their final goal is to create a hat that has been inspired by a famous building. Their work is presented to the whole school and exhibited in a public space in Wye.

Initially, end of year targets for year 7 are based on what pupils achieve in their CATS tests. Once it becomes clear what their actual art ability is, these are likely to alter.

 

Year 8

Year 8 follows year 7 in that pupils continue with a range of topics, skills and artists that they study. The main aims for year 8 are to add to the skill/knowledge set they started to develop in year 7, plus introducing more independent and individual approaches to their art work. They start to look more closely at specific art movements and develop their ability to complete projects more independently, with a focus on individual skills and interests.

 

Year 8 do an Independent Learning Project based on cubism; the topic that they are focusing on during term 2. This ILP will help them develop themselves as independent learners and will encourage pupils to push the project in their own personal direction.

For year 8, end of year targets are based on what they achieved by the end of year7. These can also alter if a pupil makes extra improvement.

 

Parents can support pupils, by helping them collect any materials that they may need (pupils will be encouraged to use free/recycled materials as much as possible). Parents can further support pupils by encouraging them to visit local galleries and developing an interest in art outside of school. There are loads of free galleries and art events!

 

Year 9

Year 9 follows year 8 in that pupils continue with a range of topics, skills and artists that they study. The main aims for year 9 are to add to the skill/knowledge set they have been developing since year 7, plus introducing them to a style of work that is more closely linked to how they will be working at GCSE. This will include introducing more independent and individual approaches to their art work and using questions/starting points that are similar to GCSE. They will be expected to work at a higher level, using GCSE style techniques for presenting and approaching projects. Some pupils will be given the opportunity to take a GCSE mini-option. This is specifically for pupils who are intending to take GCSE Art and is aimed at giving them further tools/techniques and information to allow them to easily step up to GCSE.

 

Year 9 do an Independent Learning Project based on Giger; the topic that they are focusing on during term 4. This ILP will help them develop themselves as independent learners and will encourage pupils to push the project in their own personal direction.

 

For year 9, end of year targets are based on what they achieved by the end of year8. These can also alter if a pupil makes extra improvement.

 

Parents can support pupils, by helping them collect any materials that they may need (pupils will be encouraged to use free/recycled materials as much as possible). Parents can further support pupils by encouraging them to visit local galleries and developing an interest in art outside of school. There are loads of free galleries and art events!

 

For further information about the art curriculum, please contact Mrs R Riordan -   rebecca.riordan@wyeschool.org.uk

 

 

Design Technology

KS3 DT

Introduction

At Wye School, we predominantly follow the National Curriculum at Key Stage 3. Students in years 7 and 8 learn about design and technology through project based learning, focusing on product design and textiles. Student combine practical and technological skills with creative thinking to design and make products and systems that meet human needs. Projects include ‘Mobile Phone Covers’ and ‘Balloon Powered Racers’ in year 7 and ‘Balancing Rainforest Creatures’ in year 8.

We assess our students regularly throughout the projects. These results are combined to give a reported national curriculum sub-level each term. Students are given a National Curriculum target to work towards by the end of the year. To enrich the learning of our most able students, we challenge them through ensuring that their projects are more advanced and that they are using higher level skills in their designing and making. For our lower ability pupils, we focus on the key learning objectives using more prescribed design-writing frames and guiding their practical work.

Year 7

Students work on two projects: ‘Mobile Phone Covers’ is a Textiles based project and ‘Balloon Powered Racers’ is a Resistant Materials based project. In the Textiles students learn the techniques of felt making and batik. In Resistant Materials students learn how to make a wooden mould which they then use in the vacuum former. Throughout both these projects, the students develop skills in: research, designing, planning, ICT programmes, making, using tools and evaluating.

Most of the project work is done in school. Parents can support learning by encouraging their students to be aware of product design all around them.

Year 8

In year 8 students only work on one DT project as they spend half of the year following a Computer Science scheme of learning. ‘Balancing Rainforest Creatures’ is a Resistant Materials project. This moves students on in their making and design skills.

Again, most of the project work is done in school. Parents can support learning by encouraging their students to be aware of product design all around them.

For further information about the design technology curriculum, please contact Miss S Phillips -   suzanne.phillips@wyeschool.org.uk

 

 

Physical Education and Games

Key Stage 3 PE Curriculum

 

Minimum entitlement:

In order to achieve the aims of our PE curriculum, all pupils at Wye School will be entitled to enjoy the following in their PE, health and school sport experience:

  • At least two hours per week of a challenging core curriculum which has a good balance between breadth and depth of activities, enabling both a wealth of opportunities and deep learning;

  • Participate in adapted/Paralympic sports and activities in curricular or extra-curricular provision;

  • To undertake a recognised award or qualification in physical education, dance, health, leadership or sport;

  • An inclusive and exciting extra-curricular programme that extends and enriches learning and enables them to train and compete with purpose;

  • Represent their school in a sporting (or dance-related) competition or festival.

 

Key Stage 4 PE Curriculum

 

Minimum entitlement:

In order to achieve the aims of our PE curriculum, all pupils at Wye School will be entitled to enjoy the following in their PE, health and school sport experience:

  • At least 1.5 hours per week of a core curriculum which has a good balance between breadth and depth of activities;

  • Students will have some choice of activities enabling both a wealth of opportunities and deep learning;

  • Opportunity to participate in sports and activities in curricular and extra-curricular time;

  • An inclusive and exciting extra-curricular programme that extends and enriches learning and enables them to train and compete with purpose;

  • Represent their school in a sporting (or dance-related) competition or festival.

  • Inter-house competitions will occur within the curriculum as a means of teaching respect and teamwork as well as developing the confidence to perform under pressure in a safe environment.

 

National Curriculum

· Pupils should build on and embed the physical development and skills learned in key stages 1 and 2, become more competent, confident and expert in their techniques, and apply them across different sports and physical activities. They should understand what makes a performance effective and how to apply these principles to their own and others’ work. They should develop the confidence and interest to get involved in exercise, sports and activities out of school and in later life, and understand and apply the long-term health benefits of physical activity.

Pupils should be taught to:

· use a range of tactics and strategies to overcome opponents in direct competition through team and individual games [for example, handball, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders, rugby and tennis]

· develop their technique and improve their performance in other competitive sports [for example, athletics and gymnastics]

· take part in outdoor and adventurous activities which present intellectual and physical challenges and be encouraged to work in a team, building on trust and developing skills to solve problems, either individually or as a group

· analyse their performances compared to previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best

· take part in competitive sports and activities both inside and outside school through inter-house competitions, community links or sports clubs.

 

Performance

Use increasingly challenging and competitive situations through which students are able to:

· demonstrate a high level of practical skills, tactical understanding and decision-making;

· create and choreograph routines in aesthetic activities;

· devise tactics and set plays in modified games;

· apply a detailed knowledge of rules and regulations.

· Include elements of choice where appropriate that enable students to deepen learning and select activities relevant to their identity with physical activity.

· Progressively increase the use of performance analysis, enabling students to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of both technical and tactical aspects of performance.

 

These would typically be achieved through the following genres of sports, with at least one individual activity and one team game being studied in more depth:

· Games (invasion; net/wall; striking and fielding)

· Aesthetic activities

· Athletics

· Adventurous activities

· Aquatic activities

 

Leadership

The curriculum should provide students with opportunities to:

· learn and practice the organisational skills required to lead small group warm-ups and cool downs;

· learn and practice the skills required to organise small practices for peers or younger pupils independently or in small groups;

· learn how to undertake officiating roles in lessons with authority;

· learn, practice and demonstrate the communication skills and leadership competencies required to achieve the ‘Fit to Lead’ bronze, silver and gold Awards

· In year 7, students will experience the Sport Education model as a means of learning to lead.

Health and well-being

· Use the curriculum to show how improvements in personal well-being can be achieved by including regular, strenuous physical activity in a balanced lifestyle.

The curriculum will:

· incorporate activities whereby students learn trust and cooperation as and when appropriate (e.g. paired/group work in aesthetic activities);

· include elements of sport science in everyday learning in PE such as: the major bones of the hip and shoulder girdles; the location and actions of major skeletal muscles and how increasing their strength or endurance improves performance; functional knowledge of the respiratory and circulation systems as they apply to improving practical performance;

· incorporate elements of health and skill-related fitness specific to a range of activities;

· provide specific opportunities for students to develop aspects of their character that will promote positive mental well-being for themselves (such as confidence and resilience) and opportunities which develop empathy for others through PE. (i.e. adapted/disability sports);

· provide specific opportunities for students to explore issues in relation to weight, body fat, fitness, exercise and nutrition/hydration.

· Inter-house competitions will occur within the curriculum as a means of teaching respect and teamwork as well as developing the confidence to perform under pressure in a safe environment.

 

For further information about the physical education and games curriculum, please contact Miss D Lulham - denise.lulham@wyeschool.org.uk

 

 

 

PSHE and Citizenship

 

KS3 PSHE and Citizenship

Introduction

In PSHE and Citizenship pupils cover a wide range of topics that encompass citizenship, personal, social and health education. There are no National Curriculum levels in PSHE; instead the pupils are encouraged to evaluate their own progress and set targets that develop their personal, learning and thinking skills.

The pupils learn valuable skills that aid progression across a wide range of subjects at GCSE level. They learn to improve their creative, independent and team working skills, all of which are crucial to a meaningful learning experience. The pupils learn to understand their strengths and weaknesses and how to develop and improve them through a curriculum that examines the self as well as the wider world.

The pupils use booklets that are given to them at the beginning of each new topic. These booklets support pupils in organising their ideas in a structured and neatly presented way.. These booklets also facilitate differentiation as they can be adapted to cater for individual pupils needs.

The PSHE lessons encourage pupils to ask questions and to develop opinions on issues that are relevant to them as individuals and also as part of a wider community. The emphasis, in these lessons is on fun, energetic lessons that provide a wide range of stimuli for each pupil.

 

Year 7

The year 7 groups begin their introduction to PSHE by learning about their brains, how they learn and how they can best develop their skills. The curriculum covers a wide range of topics from politics to healthy eating.

 

Year 8

Year 8 groups begin to look at the world of business and finance, but also examine wider global issues such as the rights of the child and drug and alcohol abuse. Year 8 also follow a careers module through the enrichment programme which allows them to reflect on their skills and aspirations and the career opportunities open to them.

 

Year 9

Year 9 pupils cover a range of topics that are part of the Citizenship GCSE curriculum. The students begin by examining the lives of children who have been impacted by war and then move on to study the Rwandan genocide, the impact of the mass media on society and race relations. There is also a strong focus in Year 9 on sex education. Within these lessons, the emphasis is put on discussion, allowing the pupils to establish their own viewpoint and also allowing them to immerse themselves into the opinions of others within the group.

We strive to create an environment where the Year 9 pupils feel confident and comfortable expressing their opinions on a wide range of global and personal issues.

 

For more information about the PSHE and citizenship curriculum, please contact Miss E Ozenbrook - emma.ozenbrook@wyeschool.org.uk

 

 

Religious Studies

KS3 Religious Studies

Introduction 

In Religious Studies, we broadly follow the Kent Agreed Syllabus and our main aim is to promote understanding and tolerance of different cultures, traditions and beliefs. Religious studies at Wye includes a variety of religion, philosophy and ethics. Throughout KS3, pupils will develop their skills in analysis, interpretation, reflection, application and evaluation by looking at a range of historical and contemporary issues.

Pupils are assessed 3 times in one year to help them know how to progress to the next level. To support their children’s learning, parents can regularly read or watch the news with their child. It can be enriching for the pupils to visit a variety of different cultural places such as Canterbury Cathedral or London Central Mosque.

Year 7

In year 7, pupils look at a variety of topics that develop their skills to express their own opinions whilst clearly understanding the beliefs of others. Pupils study Christianity, Sikhism and Islam as major world religions. The Independent Learning Project for year 7 is focused on Islam to encourage pupils to broaden their knowledge of key Muslim beliefs.

Year 8

In year 8, pupils study a range of ethical and religious issues. Pupils spend a substantial amount of time looking at Buddhism and Hinduism however they also look at the meaning of spirituality to different people. The Independent Learning Project for year 8 is a comparison of Buddhism, Hinduism and Christianity beliefs on key ethical issues.

Year 9

In year 9, pupils study a range of different beliefs from Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. Pupils also study the philosophical and ethical issue of what it means to be human including the study of inspirational humans such as Malala, Gandhi and Martin Luther King. There is a strong emphasis on comparison and evaluation of beliefs. Pupil’s Independent Learning Project is based on a comparing key beliefs of Christianity and Islam.

For more information about the religious studies curriculum, please contact Miss Burden – Rachael.burden@wyeschool.org.uk

 

Geography 

KS3 Geography

Introduction

Students study the National Curriculum in years 7, 8 and 9.  The course is divided into five/six modules which cover a range of both physical and human topics from the local to the international scale and reflect the breadth of the subject. 

We live in a world of amazing beauty, infinite complexity and rigorous challenge. Geography is the subject which opens the door to this dynamic world and prepares student for the role of global citizen in the 21st century. Through studying geography students begin to appreciate how places and landscapes are formed, how people and environments interact, what consequences arise from our everyday decisions, and what a diverse range of cultures and societies exist and interconnect.

Geography is a subject which builds on young people’s own experiences, helping them to formulate questions, develop their intellectual skills and find answers to issues affecting their lives. It introduces them to distinctive investigative tools such as maps, fieldwork and the use of powerful digital communication technologies. It opens their eyes to the beauty and wonder around them and acts as a source of inspiration and creativity. More than this, it ensures that they appreciate the complexity of attitudes and values which shape the way we use and misuse the environment. Through geography, people learn to value and care for the planet and all its inhabitants.

Student progress is assessed regularly through modular assessments and they complete a Geography ILP.  All assessment use grades linked to the National Curriculum levels.

Year 7

In Year 7 students begin by developing their geographical fieldwork skills and decision making capabilities through fieldwork based around the schools amazing locality.  This leads onto investigating global and national patterns with regards to weather and climate and the human and physical changes that are and have occurred over time.  Students also have the opportunity to investigate one of fastest developing countries in the world; China and how this development has an impact upon them.  Students complete the year by looking at coastal environments and the associated tourism activities that emerge as a result of these distinctive landscapes. 

Year 8

In Year 8 students further develop their understanding of geographical processes by looking at ecosystems at a local and global scale.  Students will be introduced to some of the most amazing geographical landscapes on earth and investigate how these have developed over time.  There is an investigation into the continent of Africa and the variety of different landscapes and peoples that live here.  This will develop their understanding of differing cultures and how these compare to their own.  In addition to this there will be a focus upon the world dominating city of London and an investigation into where our food really comes from.  In Year 8 students will build on their learning in Year 7 and take their learning to a higher level.  They are expected to express their views using more detail and evidence and be able to communicate their understanding of Geography in a more specific manner.  Students will continue to learn and practice skills in Geography such as map work, understanding and explaining why places and environments occur as they do and decision making activities based on peoples differing opinions on issues.

Year 9

In Year 9 students take a more in depth look at specific topics to prepare them for GCSE Geography.  Students are unable to study every possible topic at GCSE so students have the opportunity to be introduced some of the exciting topics that form part of the current A Level specifications.  This includes looking at patterns of crime at both a local and global scale and how geographers work to bring this information together.  They will also study the topic of conflict and disease which really tests their decision making skills.  Other more traditional topics such as plate tectonics and rivers are studied in preparation for their GCSE Studies.  Students will continue to develop skills learnt in the previous years while practicing extended writing skills to prepare them for exam questions.  Students will also be encouraged to think about sustainable solutions to problems identified throughout the year.

For more information about the Geography curriculum please contact Neil Gretton neil.gretton@wyeschoool.org.uk

 

 

Modern Foreign Languages

 

KS3 Modern Foreign Languages

Introduction

At Wye School, we follow the National Curriculum at Key Stage 3. We teach our pupils to be confident and competent in the four key language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Within this model there is a strong emphasis on grammatical skills and understanding. This aids their progression to GCSE by creating strong foundations in both communication skills and knowledge of how a language works. Whilst we primarily follow the Expo 1 and 2 KS3 course, real life cross-curricular and topical approaches, such as pantomime and sport, are also used to increase the relevance of learning another language and to promote engagement. Our pupils are also involved in communicating with students from two partner schools in Brittany, France, where they can practise the French they learn in class in a real world situation.

We assess our pupils regularly with formal assessments at the end of each of our six terms. We give each pupil a National Curriculum target to work towards by the end of the year. We use a variety of approaches such as group work, pair work and independent reflection. The use of ICT is also promoted both in and out of school to develop language abilities. Games and puzzles and problem solving activities also form a solid feature of our teaching and learning programme. To enrich the learning of our most able students, we provide opportunities for them to tackle GCSE Level work and believe that there should be no age restriction on what is learnt, for example, teaching the subjunctive mood, an A-Level topic, to our most gifted students. For our lower ability pupils, there is an emphasis on speaking, listening, confidence building skills and enjoyment. Great use is made of visual and kinaesthetic approaches to teaching and learning to create an environment where all can access the curriculum.

Year 7

Currently, year 7 are taught a variety of topics, including basic grammar and spelling, meetings and greetings, being able to describe themselves and their families and where they live. This is carried out through the medium of all four language skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing. In French, this year also involves a cross-curricular module involving a sports competition, such as the Football World Cup, where students learn the countries, nationalities and sports in French. Our year 7 Independent Learning Project complements the curriculum, with students researching in depth other French speaking countries around the world. Students are also encouraged to participate in the yearly National Foreign Languages Spelling Bee competition.

Year 8

We expand upon previous understanding of our year 7s by giving our pupils transferable skills beyond the classroom, for example using email to communicate with French students. Year 8 develops the grammar and understanding from Year 7 and Year 8s are introduced to using both the future and past tense as well as the present tense in both languages. Topics covered include food and drink, clothes, my town and daily routines. In addition, for those taking French, this year involves a cross-curricular project with drama, with students performing a French pantomime. In this way, students are encouraged to understand the benefits of repetition, non-verbal communication and rote learning for language learning.

 

For more information about the modern foreign languages curriculum, please contact Madame Steed - leanne.steed@wyeschool.org.uk

 

 

History

KS3 History

Introduction

At Wye School, we follow the National Curriculum at Key Stage 3. We teach our pupils to be confident and competent in the core skills of source analysis, understanding causation, significance, chronology, change and continuity, diversity and interpretation. Students are also taught how to successfully structure an argument in extended writing pieces. This aids their progression to GCSE by creating strong foundations in exploring enquiries through source analysis skills, such as bias, context, authorship and interpretation. We begin Year 7 studying and developing key historical skills before following a more traditional curriculum through Key Stage 3. Residential and day trips are also used to increase the relevance of learning about events in history and to promote engagement. We assess our pupils regularly with formal assessments at the end of each of our six terms. We give each pupil a National Curriculum target to work towards by the end of the year. We use a variety of approaches such as group work, pair work and independent study and research opportunities. The use of ICT is also promoted both in and out of school to develop historical knowledge. To enrich the learning of our most able students, we provide opportunities for them to tackle GCSE Level work and believe that there should be no age restriction on what is learnt, for example, giving higher level questions and essay work to our most gifted students. Independent research opportunities enable gifted students to develop a deeper understanding of historical issues and concepts and provide opportunities for them to lead other students on certain topics. For our lower ability pupils, there is an emphasis on confidence building skills and enjoyment. Great use is made of visual and kinaesthetic approaches to teaching and learning to create an environment where all can access the curriculum. In preparation for GCSEs, students will get an increased opportunity to develop extended writing as they progress at school.

Year 7

Currently, year 7 begins with a study of key source skills, focusing a broad range of historical topics. We follow this with a more traditional curriculum comprising the Battle of Hastings and the Norman invasion, The Black Death, The Peasants Revolt and the Murder of Thomas Becket. Re-enactment and project work is a big feature of the year 7 curriculum.

 Year 8

The year 8 curriculum builds on skills learnt in year 7 by continuing to develop skills in source analysis and essay writing techniques.  Students will be able to analyse sources and explain their views on particular people, issues and events.  They will be able to compare the experiences of different groups of people in the same period and different periods.  The course of study provides an overview of different historical periods and enables students to make an informed choice about their future in history. Topics covered include how the British Empire shaped the world we live in, focusing on the Triangular Slave Trade and leading on to the Civil Rights Movement in America. The year finishes with a look at 100 years of war in the 20th Century, specializing in the events of World War II.

Year 9

The Year 9 curriculum is focused upon the 20th century, but develops a far broader, international focus. They begin the year evaluating how World War Two was won by the allies and study topics including the Holocaust, Russian Revolution and the Cold War. They also get a more intimate local study, centring on the Second World War and its impact upon the local community.

For more information about the history curriculum, please contact Chris Wickington or Melanie Hodgins - chris.wickington@wyeschool.org.uk melanie.hodgins@wyeschool.org.uk

 

 

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