Pupil Premium at Wye School

Introduction to the Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium is additional funding given to schools so that they can support particular groups of pupils who are known to be at risk of underachievement and to close the attainment gap between them and their peers. The Pupil Premium is allocated to schools for pupils, from reception to Year 11, who are known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM) or who have been eligible for FSM in the past six years (Ever 6). The Pupil Premium is £935 per pupil for 2017-18. It also includes other payments for students who are LAC at £1900 per student as well as payments for students of military personnel.


The Pupil Premium Context at Wye School

Wye School is a free school which opened in September 2013. Our PAN (Published Admission Number) is 90 per year group. We currently have Years 7-11 within the school and 17% of these students qualify for Pupil Premium (compared with the national average pupil premium figure of 26%).  In our new year 7 15% of students are pupil premium.

Our provision is enhanced through personalisation, to ensure maximum impact and raising of aspirations for individuals. Our approach is rooted in the Secrets to Success Pupil Report, as detailed below:


General characteristics of a well-spent Pupil Premium:

  • Proper analysis of where pupils are underachieving and why.
  • Good use of research evidence, including the Sutton Trust’s Toolkit, when choosing activities – our focus is on effective feedback and meta-cognition.
  • Focus on high quality teaching, rather than relying on interventions to compensate.
  • Frequent use of achievement data to check effectiveness of interventions
  • Systematic focus on clear pupil feedback and advice for improving their work.
  • Designated senior leader has clear overview of the funding allocation.
  • All teachers are aware of their Pupil Premium children so they can take responsibility for progress.
  • Strategies are available for improving attendance, behaviour or family links.
  • Performance management of staff includes discussions about Pupil Premium children.


2016-2017

In 2016/17, we received £68,868 for pupil premium and pupil premium plus payments.

Targeted Group Support strategies continue to be funded for those identified as needing these boosters. Students also receive personalised support.


Expected Impact of 2016-17 funding

  • Through careful allocation of the pupil premium we planned to:
  • close the gap in attainment in core subjects.
  • continue to ensure that attendance levels remain above 90% for all students.
  • further raise reading ages of students with below average levels.
  • Increase engagement for lower ability Pupil Premium students through the provision of stimulating alternative education at another setting.
  • Continue to ensure that temporary exclusions, for this demographic, are minimised and in line with that for non-Pupil premium students.
  • Provide additional opportunities for more able Pupil Premium students in order to increase aspiration and future attainment.


Impact of Pupil Premium Funding.

Through careful allocation of the pupil premium we planned to:


 

Close the gap in attainment in core subjects.

Year Group

Subject

PP i/c PP+

Non PP

Gap

7 KPI

English

62%

71%

-9%

7 KPI

Maths

54%

71%

-17%

7 KPI

Science

51%

37%

+14%

8 KPI

English

77%

78%

-1%

8 KPI

Maths

53%

51%

+2%

8 SAT levels

2=1 sublevel

Science

36

36

0

9 KPI

English

70%

68%

+2%

9 KPI

Maths

57%

62%

-5%

9 SAT levels

2=1 sublevel

Science

39

40

-1

10 GCSE

% level 4+

English

60%

89%

-19%

10 GCSE

% level 4+

Maths

40%

71%

-31%

10 GCSE

% level 4+

Science

70

65

+5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In over half of cases (shaded green) the gap between PP and non PP is either small or positive, PP pupils doing slightly better than non PP pupils. Last year there were significant gaps in year 9 English and Year 9 Science. Support within science including a series of lunchtime support sessions has closed this gap (PP students are now doing slightly better than their non PP peers). However, the gaps within Maths and English have widened and this is a very key area to which we will direct support this year in anticipation of GCSE examinations. In the first instance we have committed to purchase revision guides for all PP students. 4 PP students are also receiving additional support within the curriculum, having dropped 2 options subjects to facilitate this. They are also using AE to inspire and motivate. This accounts for 55% of the PP or PP+ students (5/9) are receiving targeted additional support within or outside of lessons to address this gap. These students are those that contribute most significantly to the gap that we are seeing.


Continue to ensure that attendance levels remain above 90% for all students.

Attendance for Pupil premium students was 92.1%.  This is below the 95.3% for non PP students. Although we met our target the attendance of some students within this category. 21% of PP students were PA and this is an area which must therefore be a major focus for next year. We have employed a new attendance officer and assigned a member of SLT to support in what is a major focus for the coming year.


Further raise reading ages of students with below average levels.

Year 7 PP students entered the year with a reading age of 10.2 years on average. Their current reading age average is 12.0 years. They have made an average gain of 1.8 years in 8 months.

Year 8 PP students entered the school with a reading age of 9.5 years. They currently have an average reading aged of 12.2 years. This is a gain of 2.6 years in 20 months.

In both instances the gap is closing but there is still work to do in terms of matching reading ages to chronological ages. There are a few students with a large discrepancy between reading age and chronological age. These students also receive 1:1 support with their literacy and reading. A few students with very low RA on entry have no books at home so it is vital that we have a well stocked library with books that are both age and challenge appropriate for students with low reading ages. Once again part of last year’s PP budget was spent on books in this category and a further quantity of books was purchased over the Summer with a view to inspiring less able readers to continue to engage with books..


Increase engagement for lower ability Pupil Premium students through the provision of stimulating alternative education at another setting.

Year 10

Of the 12 students who receive pupil premium or pupil premium plus (post LAC) payments we identified 5 students who would struggle to access all parts of the traditional academic curriculum that will be available for their peers post key stage 3. After extensive research regarding the possibilities that other local schools would be able offer, we settled on Canterbury Academy. 5 students began attending 1 day a week at a cost of roughly £1000 per student. All of the students enjoyed the experience very much. One received a prize for coming top in his catering group. All increased in confidence. Two students will now access work experience. Two others are keen to continue at CA to obtain certificates for their work. Parental and student feedback from these opportunities has been excellent.


Continue to ensure that temporary exclusions, for this demographic, are minimised and in line with that for non-Pupil premium students.

A total of 18 students have received temporary exclusions this academic year. The exclusions totalled 62.5 days. 7 of these students are in receipt of pupil premium payments. 33.5 days were attributable to PP students with 25 days being due to 2 students, both of whom joined us this year in year 7 with complicated histories. One student is now at a special school. The other remains with us and has not had a period of exclusion since April when we introduced a new behaviour policy.


Provide additional opportunities for more able Pupil Premium students in order to increase aspiration and future attainment.

During enrichment week this year we authorised part payment for all FSM students so that they were able to access a large range of activities throughout the week at a reduced rate. Opportunities included foreign residential trips, attending an activity centre for 3 days on a residential trip, theatre trips and curriculum based trips. 42/67 students received financial help to engage with these opportunities.

We have offered similar opportunities throughout the year for the large variety of trips that student are offered. In addition enrichment opportunities that require a payment such as mandarin and golf are also subsidised in this fashion. The support is discrete with respect to the individuals involved but well publicised within the school community so that students are not restricted by their financial situation.


2017-2018

Funding for 2017 -18 is based on 77 students:  payment is not confirmed as current government allocations on the D of E site give student numbers as only 360 students. We estimate payments will be in the region of £79,715 as we have 8 LAC students on role

Targeted Group Support strategies continue to be funded for those identified in Year 8-11 as needing these boosters. Students also receive personalised support. Year 7 students for whom the school receives Pupil Premium will also be in receipt of both group and personalised support.


Expected Impact of 2017-18 funding

Through careful allocation of the pupil premium we plan to:

  • Continue to close the gap in attainment in core subjects.
  • continue to ensure that attendance levels remain above 90% for all students.
  • further raise reading ages of students with below average levels.
  • Increase engagement for lower ability Pupil Premium students through the provision of stimulating alternative education at another setting.
  • Continue to ensure that temporary exclusions, for this demographic, are minimised and in line with that for non-Pupil premium students.
  • Provide additional opportunities for more able Pupil Premium students in order to increase aspiration and future attainment. This will include paying for PP students to complete Duke of Edinburgh courses.
  • Ensure that we have smaller class sizes for students in core subjects.
  • Include intervention periods staffed by teachers within the curriculum.
  • Include a mindfulness period for students who are anxious about home situations.
  • Raise aspirations and interest through the united learning access programme.
  • Enrich the curriculum for some PP students by paying for music lessons that they otherwise could not access.
  • Improved attendance of PP students is a major focus for the coming academic year.
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